Koken wan honer

Chicken Pie

Source: This pea soup recipe was found in Libellus de Arte Coquinaria a comparative analysis of 4 manuscripts, dating from the 13th century, collection of 35 recipes in three languages... Danish, Icelandic, & Low German.

Original Recipe:

De cibo qui dicitur koken wan honer.

Man skal gøræ en grytæ af degh, oc skær et høns thær I alt I styki, oc latæ thær I spæk wæl skoren sum ærtær,pipær oc komiæn oc æggi blomæ, wæl slaghæn mæth safran; oc takæ thæn grytæ oc latæ bakæ I en ofn. Thæt hetær kokæn wan honer.

Translation: (Translation from Libellus de Arte Coquinaria: An Early Northern Cookery Book)

The food that is called Chicken Pie.

One should make a shell of dough, and put into it a hen, cut into pieces; and add bacon, diced the size of peas, pepper, cumin, and egg yolks well beaten with saffron. Then take the [filled] shell and bake it in an oven. It is called Chicken Pie.

My Interpretation:

1 lb. chicken 1 small onion
½ tsp. cumin 6 eggs
20 threads saffron ½ tsp. ground black pepper
2 quarts Chicken Stock
2 oz. bacon, cooked and crumbled
1 pie crust (see Paest Royall) 

Boil chicken for 30 min in chicken base with one small onion. Allow chicken to cool. Meanwhile, cook and crumble bacon. Place prepared pie crust into pie pan. Shred chicken removing bones and skin. Then beat eggs and mix the spices into the beaten eggs. Then mix the chicken, bacon and egg mixture. Place into the pie pan. Preheat oven to 425°F. Bake the pie at 425°F for 15 minutes. Then reduce the oven temperature to 300°F. Bake for another 30 minutes.

Notes:

References:

"The Socalled Harpestreng Cookbook." Monumenta Culinaria Et Diaetetica Historica. Ed. M. Kristensen. Thomas Gloning, 18 July 2000. Web. 28 Sept. 2012. <http://www.uni-giessen.de/gloning/tx/harp-kkr.htm>.13th Century "K" Codex of Libellus de Arte Coquinaria.

Grewe, Rudolf, and Constance B. Hieatt. Libellus De Arte Coquinaria: An Early Northern Cookery Book. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2001. Print.A comparative analysis of 4 manuscripts, dating from the 13th century, collection of 35 recipes in three languages... Danish, Icelandic, & Low German.